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Benefits of Saturate Sparing All Purpose and Emulsified Shortening
Benefits of Bunge’s saturate sparing all-purpose and emulsified shortening
Reduced Saturate Shortenings
Reduce saturate fat levels by greater than 40% in your product.

Saturates plus trans are reduced by 60% over Non Hydrogenated products,

60% less than traditional products,

and 40% less than Reduced Trans products.

BUNGE’S SATURATE SPARING TECHNOLOGY utilizes proprietary non-lipid ingredients, blending and crystallization processes (triacylglycerols mismatch) to reduce saturate levels by greater than 40% in all purpose and emulsified shortening. A saturate level as low as 15% can be obtained with a system based upon canola or high oleic canola, X-factor type hard fat, and a structure enhancing cellulose fiber.

Additionally, Bunge’s saturate sparing technology has zero grams trans fat per serving and provides greater levels of heart-healthy mono- and polyunsaturated levels over traditional shortening.

Saturate Sparing Technology provides superior nutrition and functionality over traditional shortenings.

Chart depicting the fat makeup between saturate sparing shortening, traditional shoterning and commodity soybean oil.
Label for Bunge 148 All Purpose Shortening

148 All Purpose Shortening

Ingredients: Canola Oil, Hydrogenated Palm Oil, Powdered Cellulose, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Polyglycerol Esters of Fatty Acids And Monoglycerides Added. TBHQ And Citric Acid Added To Help Protect Flavor.

Facts Panel:

Saturated Fat 3g
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 6g

Label for Bunge 172 All Purpose Shortening

172 All Purpose Shortening

Ingredients: Canola Oil, Hydrogenated Palm Oil, Powdered Cellulose, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil With TBHQ And Citric Acid Added To Help Protect Flavor.

Facts Panel:

Saturated Fat 2.5g
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 7g

Label for Bunge 358 Cake and Icing Shortening

358 Cake and Icing Shortening

Ingredients: Canola Oil, Hydrogenated Palm Oil, Powdered Cellulose, Hydrogenated Soybean Oil. Polyglycerol Esters of Fatty Acids And Monoglycerides Added. TBHQ And Citric Acid Added To Help Protect Flavor.

Facts Panel:

Saturated Fat 2.5g
Trans Fat 0g
Polyunsaturated Fat 3g
Monounsaturated Fat 7g

Powdered cellulose *: minuscule pieces of wood pulp or plant fibers that coat the cheese and keep it from clumping by blocking out moisture. Cellulose products, gums and fibers allow food manufactures to offer white bread with high dietary fiber content, low-fat ice cream that still feels creamy on the tongue, and allow cooks to sprinkle cheese over their dinner without taking time to shred. Cellulose additives belong to a family of substances known as hydrocolloids that act in various ways with water, such as creating gels.”

* The Wall Street Journal, May 4, 2011 by Sarah Nassauer.

The Science of Saturate Sparing Icon THE SCIENCE BEHIND THE
TRICYLGLYCEROL MISMATCH
SOLUTION

Triacylglycerols mismatch such as PSS and SSS promote the formation of a harder crystal network.

Since these are the TAGs in the solid part of the network, it is important to understand how they interact.

Enhanced intermolecular interactions (PSS and SSS) within crystal network may be optimized to make harder networks with less saturates.

The saturated TAG versions of these fatty acids are fairly limited:

Low trans margarine formulations contain higher levels of saturates to provide sufficient hardness, PSS and SSS may be used to produce 0 trans spread margarine with lowered saturates.

Bunge’s Intellectual Properties covers broad spectrum of this technology such as Structuring of TAG systems Crystalline net work via utilization of unique fiber and triglycerides species.

Following is the list of IP publications:
Pub. No: US2009/0123619 A1...published May 12, 2009,
Pub. No: US2011/0281014 A1...published Nov. 17, 2011,
Pub. No: US2011/0281015 A1...published Nov. 17, 2011,
International Pub. No: WO 2011/143529 A1...Nov. 17, 2011